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From the Archives of Western Newspapers

Posted on July 20, 2023 by Ryan Dahlman

By Samantha Johnson
Commentator/Courier
Local Journalism Initiative Reporter

Thursday, July 18, 1901 – Calgary Weekly Herald

Large crowds were in attendance at the Inter-Western Pacific Exhibition even though the horse races, which are always a big draw for the Britishers, do not begin until today. The agriculture exhibits kept the attention of a large portion of the crowd. The open-air saloon doing a flourishing trade as thirsts were numerous and insatiable due to the hot, dry weather. A live imitation Kruger was onsite and battered with eggs throughout the day.

As the time draws nearer for a settlement of the terms under which the Territories are to enter Confederation as one or more provinces, those of our people – and they are very few – who do any thinking for themselves are beginning to realize the gravity of the problems we shall soon be called upon to face, and the danger that exists that in the coming battle of the brain the Territories may get the worst of the deal.

From Queenstown, the Cork Examiner printed a sensational story last Friday about the miraculous escape of a four-masted passenger steamer westward bound from being wrecked off the Fastnet rocks at 3 p.m. The fog lifted in the nick of time and saved the steamer from a fearful disaster.

Friday, July 18, 1902 – Ponoka Herald

It is now considered practically certain that King Edward will be crowned on Saturday, Aug. 9 since the holding of coronation ceremonies on Aug. 11 would involve another full bank holiday with the attendant dislocation of general businesses while Saturdays are universally observed as half holidays. It is understood that the general outline of the programme of the procession to Westminster Abbey will not be changed but the pageant will be shorn of some of its magnificence.

  Another case of measles developed in the village on Saturday. The victim is Fred Earl, who has been quarantined in the pest house and is progressing favourably.

A local schoolmistress who has a dread of all contagious diseases sent a child home the other day because her mother was ill. The next morning, the girl presented herself at school and said, “we’ve got a baby at our house, but mama said to tell you it’s not catching.”

Thursday, July 19, 1906 – The Wetaskiwin Times

The provincial department of agriculture has taken another step forward, which will be appreciated by the people of Alberta and farmers in particular. Realizing the great success of the creameries, and also taking note of the fact that large quantities of poultry are shipped into the province annually, the department has decided to take the poultry raised by Alberta Farmers in the autumn to fatten and slaughter and give the proceeds back to the farmer.

In Hastings Coulee, C.A. Hastings has severed his connection with the Coulee Ranch, where he was employed for the past four and a half years. He has a large acreage he has broken and plans to work it. Look out for wedding bells soon.

The businessmen of Bawlf have clubbed together to request the postmaster at Camrose forward mail on Saturdays. The citizens of Bawlf were promised their mail daily by June 1 and then July 1. The latter date has passed and still the department has not fulfilled its promise. It is hoped we will have a daily service by next Christmas to at least receive news from home.

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